[Epub] ➠ Grass for My Pillow ➡ Saiichi Maruya – Lalaweek.us

Grass for My Pillow First Published In Japanese In 1966, The Debut Novel Of The Critically Acclaimed Author Of Singular Rebellion Is An Unusual Portrait Of A Deeply Taboo Subject In Twentieth Century Japanese Society Resistance To The Draft In World War II In 1940 Shokichi Hamada Is A Conscientious Objector Who Dodges Military Service By Simply Disappearing From Society, Taking To The Country As An Itinerant Peddler By The Name Of Sugiura Until The End Of The War In 1945 In 1965, Hamada Works As A Clerk At A Conservative University, His War Resistance A Dark Secret Of The Past That Present Day Events Force Into The Light, Confronting Him With Unexpected Consequences Of His Refusal To Conform Twenty Years Earlier.

[Epub] ➠ Grass for My Pillow  ➡ Saiichi Maruya – Lalaweek.us
  • Hardcover
  • 345 pages
  • Grass for My Pillow
  • Saiichi Maruya
  • English
  • 04 October 2017
  • 0231126581

    10 thoughts on “[Epub] ➠ Grass for My Pillow ➡ Saiichi Maruya – Lalaweek.us


  1. says:

    What has your country offered you What has it done for you What have you accomplished for your country What have you given back to your birth land The notion of patriotism charred in the rebuttals and accusatory insinuations the double edged sword seeped in the ironies of free will conflicting patriotic legitimacy probing the sovereignty of allegiance v s rebellion The devout ready to defend his or her country, does it signify blind devotion without having to question the socio pol What has your country offered you What has it done for you What have you accomplished for your country What have you given back to your birth land The notion of patriotism charred in the rebuttals and accusatory insinuations the double edged sword seeped in the ironies of free will conflicting patriotic legitimacy probing the sovereignty of allegiance v s rebellion The devout ready to defend his or her country, does it signify blind devotion without having to question the socio political dogma The status of Patriotism positioned on shaky grounds during war time Is it criminal to raise scepticism over the transgressions of one s motherland, the land on which freedom must breathe Are we, the honouree of domicile identities become vulnerable pall bearers of humanity clashing into the stoic walls of fragmented patriotism Where do the inst...


  2. says:

    This is the story of Shokichi Hamada, a doctor s son, a 20 year old as The Great Pacific War begins But he will not be a soldier To be a draft resister in 1940 Japan was to be worse than a burglar, worse than a murderer It was a capital offense Yet Hamada somehow survived as an itinerant repairer of clocks and as a sand artist.The story is told in constantly shifting time frames, the war years shuffling with Hamada 20 years after the war, working as an office clerk in a conservative univer This is the story of Shokichi Ha...


  3. says:

    How can I review a book so unique, and yet so foreign to me To the core, this is an anti war work written during the Vietnam War It is decades after World War II, and yet the draft resistance of an individual who spent a large period of Japan s involvement in World War II traveling around Japan escaping detection as a draft resister.The plot is non linear, wit...


  4. says:

    I once named Muraya s Rain in the Wind the most boring thing I had ever read, and while this novel is sometimes too dense for its own good, it is still mostly fascinating, and gutsy.


  5. says:

    An amazing but difficult book This is story of a draft resister in Japan in World War II Apparently this was an offense punishable by death and an act that was not ever discussed in Japan and that is still rarely talked about the position of society is that there were no draft resisters in Japan The story is told from the point of view of the same man 20 years later he is married and works as a clerk in the registry office at a University with flashbacks to various events of his life as An amazing but difficult book This is story of a draft resister in Japan in World War II Apparently this was an offense punishable by death and an act that was not ever discussed in Japan and that is still rarely talked about the position of society is that there were no draft resisters in Japan The story is told from the point of view of the same man 20 years later he is married and works as a clerk in the regist...


  6. says:

    I ve read this book repeatedly since when I was 13 Each time I read I was absorbed into it in different ways For example, I didn t understand office politics when I was 13 but now I do Coincidentally I m now at the same age as Shokichi in the book and some of the remarks made by him along the story touched me even though my life to reflect is muchmediocre than something extreme of his I found the translation was excellently done In my opinion, this is one of the best modern Japanese n I ve read this book repeatedly since when I was 13 Each time I read I was absorbed into it in different ways For example, I didn t understand office politics when I was 13 but now I do Coincidentally I m now at the same age as Shokichi in the book and some of the remarks made by...


  7. says:

    Avoidance of conscription in Japan during WWII was the most heinous of crimes worse than rape, or murder Those who were caught were beheaded And yet some did refuse At least some were fictionally imagined to have done so, as in Saiichi Maruya s 1966 novel, Grass for My Pillow ,emSasamakura , translated by Dennis Keene in 2002.Shokichi Hamada is an assistant Registrar s Clerk at a Japanese university in the 1960s When he receives a death announcement for his lover of twenty years befo Avoidance of conscription in Japan during WWII was the most heinous of crimes worse than rape, or murder Those who were caught were beheaded And yet some did refuse At least some were fictionally imagined to have done so, as in Saiichi Maruya s 1966 novel, Grass for My Pillow ,emSasamakura , translated by Dennis Keene in 2002.Shokichi Hamada is an assistant Registrar s Clerk at a Japanese university in the 1960s When he receives a death announcement for his lover of twenty years before, memory begins to surface Their time together had been durin...


  8. says:

    I ll have to be the dissenting opinion here I couldn t finish the book I only got one fifth of the way through it.I found the book description intriguing, and wanted to read about the life of a draft dodger decades later and the repercussions he faced But apparently not this one He obsesses over small details which slows the plot to a crawl, and he s unlikable as well.I got as far as the scene where the expected tension in the novel is destroyed It turns out his coworkers all know about his I ll have to be the dissenting opinion here I couldn t finish the book I only got one fifth of the way through it.I found the book description intriguing, and wanted to read about the life of a draft dodger decades later and the repercussions he faced But apparently not this one He obsesses over small details which slows the plot to a crawl, and he s unlikable as well.I got as far as the scene where the expected tension in the novel is destroyed It turns out his coworkers all know about his past, so there s no dark secret he s fighting to keep hidden.What turns me off about the main character isn t his endlessly replayin...


  9. says:

    A quiet, meditative novel about a Japanese man, Hamada, who dodges the draft during the war a crime of the worst sort and travels around the country under an assumed name Frequent back and forth time shifts, from the present 1960s, when the book was written and back to the war, with wartime chronology all mixed up, but I didn t find it too confusing Author Saiichi Maruya explores the delayed repercussions that Hamada s youthful act of rebellion has on him twenty years later, when he is a m...


  10. says:

    Once you dare challenge societal norms, your life will be filled with grass pillows Therein lies your danger and isolation, but also your freedom and genuine existence Brilliant writing with perfect ending Why isn t this book better read and acknowledged

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